California was the first state to allow medical marijuana. Now, two decades later, voters are expected to be asked whether to legalize recreational use of the drug. The legalization measure headed for the statewide November ballot is the product of months of negotiations between drug-law reformers, growers and distributors, famous financiers and politicians. Here’s a primer. Meta Viers McClatchy
California was the first state to allow medical marijuana. Now, two decades later, voters are expected to be asked whether to legalize recreational use of the drug. The legalization measure headed for the statewide November ballot is the product of months of negotiations between drug-law reformers, growers and distributors, famous financiers and politicians. Here’s a primer. Meta Viers McClatchy

Capitol Alert

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Capitol Alert

Darrell Steinberg takes a stand on pot legalization initiative

By Christopher Cadelago

ccadelago@sacbee.com

September 23, 2016 12:42 PM

UPDATED November 03, 2016 02:24 PM

Sacramento Mayor-elect Darrell Steinberg, a veteran of legislative battles over medical cannabis, said Friday he supports the fall initiative to fully legalize recreational marijuana in California.

Steinberg is the largest city leader to line up behind Proposition 64, and his support points to a thawing in local government’s historical opposition to legitimizing the drug.

The League of California Cities, the statewide organization representing municipalities, has a neutral position on the pot measure, in part because it allows localities to ban sales in their jurisdictions.

Steinberg, in a statement outlining his position, stressed that he is “no particular fan of marijuana,” and remains concerned about its health effects on children. But he said the solution is not prohibition.

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“California needs a smarter and more honest approach to marijuana policy – one that prioritizes strict regulation and prevention over criminalization, protects local decision-making authority and brings oversight and enforcement, consumer and environmental protections and a common-sense tax structure to what is already a billion-dollar industry,” Steinberg said.

He added his belief that the measure adequately protects locals’ land-use authority, safeguards employers and steers hundreds of millions of dollars to youth and job-training programs.

Steinberg, a Democrat and the former state Senate leader, joins Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom as among the most prominent elected officials to come out for pot. Newsom has chided his statewide counterparts for laying off what has been a thorny issue for politicians.

The Field-IGS Poll released late Thursday found 60 percent of likely voters support Proposition 64, 31 percent are opposed and 9 percent undecided.

Marijuana effects on your driving

NIDA's Dr. Marilyn Huestis discusses new research, which used the most sophisticated driving simulator of its kind to mirror real-life situations. Results showed that marijuana use impairs one measure of driving performance.

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA/NIH)

Christopher Cadelago: 916-326-5538, @ccadelago